Daniel Burstein

Blue Sky Content Marketing: Think outside the blog, social media and online video boxes

Every day I wake up, come into work, and stare at a box.

So do you.

Oh, it’s a magical box. I can write words in it that will instantly appear the world over.

But sometimes, we have to peer outside of this box, and think about content marketing as more than just digital words, pictures and videos.

 

Content marketing can also be a grilled cheese sandwich

Some of us (me for sure, how about you?) are so focused on digital channels for content marketing – to improve SEO, build email lists, gain more fans and followers – that we overlook an entire universe outside of this digital box.

For example, can content marketing be:

 

A grilled cheese sandwich?

In this MarketingSherpa case study, Bonvoy Adventure Travel rented the Gorilla Cheese NYC  food truck,  and let the good folks in Midtown Manhattan name their own price for lunch.

This is a great example of content marketing because it demonstrated Bonvoy’s value proposition while offering something of value to the audience: the triple cream brie with prosciutto di parma.

At the end of the gooey day, Bonvoy served up 34,000 impressions on Twitter.

 

Print?

As digital marketers and publishers, sometimes we overlook the value of good old-fashioned print. It obviously meets the two conditions of content marketing above (demonstrate value prop while providing value).

It is also more credible than digital, and, like the above example, it can help your content marketing cut through the clutter. Zig where others zag.

For example, there are 861 million results in a search for “IT Solutions,” but I guarantee there are way fewer magazine articles that cover that topic.

Don’t take my word for it. The “Godfather of Content Marketing” himself, Joe Pulizzi, wrote about why you should consider print for your content marketing strategy.

 

Customer service?

Especially if you’re a reseller or sell a product or service that can be bought elsewhere, the content you provide through customer service – over the phone, live chat, through email or on social media – can be a key differentiator.

Have you armed your customer service department with content that helps provide value to customers? Whether this content is communicated one-on-one or in a public fashion, such as a forum, could you consider your customer service interactions as content marketing?

 

What else?

I’d love to hear your ideas.

 

You may also like

More Alike than Different: Why email is Madonna, and Facebook is Lady Gaga

Content Marketing: Finding the Goldilocks zone in your blogging

5 Social Media Career Killers Panel

#TwitterTips: 5 steps for a successful 140-character conversation on Twitter

Share and Enjoy:
  • LinkedIn
  • StumbleUpon
  • Facebook
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg

Marketing



  1. January 7th, 2014 at 12:13 | #1

    Such an interesting article! As for the last point, I’m wondering if you could turn it around, take the information your customer service department is offering and send it to marketing? Maybe they can turn it into content to share on their different channels. Thanks, Daniel!

  1. No trackbacks yet.